Manufactured Home Gas Flex Lines

What Are Manufactured Home Flex Gas Lines?

Manufactured homes are made differently from traditional homes, meaning the plumbing system is installed differently as well.

It is also worth mentioning that manufactured homes are often exempted from local plumbing codes in most jurisdictions.

However, it would be wise to confirm with your local authorities before doing anything on your plumbing.

So, What Are Manufactured Home Flex Gas Lines?

As the name insinuates, manufactured home flex gas lines are pipelines through which your household gas supply flows from your central supply joint into your manufactured home. The piping is designed to be flexible, meaning it can easily snake its way around past obstacles without the need to interrupt the structural integrity of the home.

What Are The Benefits of Gas Flex Lines?

The best thing about flexible gas lines is that the homeowner doesn’t have to deal with costly repairs or remodeling once the lines are installed.

Also, unlike traditional rigid stainless steel piping, gas flex lines involve fewer fittings because they simply bend around most obstacles.

Other than cutting the cost of installation, having to deal with fewer joints also means that the chances of gas leaks are reduced considerably.

Installation Locations for Gas Flex Lines

As mentioned before, the plumbing in manufactured homes is a world apart from plumbing found in traditional homes.

Depending on the source and the destination of the gas, you can affix or mount your piping on the wall.

The positioning of the line as well as the path followed by the line during the installation process can also be determined by several factors.

  • Firstly, it will depend on the plan and design of your manufactured home.
  • Another factor is the gas supply requirements of each room.
  • Such things as the type of appliances at home may have a say as well.

More often than not, gas piping is placed under the floor of the manufactured home but you will come across a few homes with their pipes in the walls.

It is not uncommon to find the gas lines running through/on the attic space through your home ceiling joists.

Before settling on anything or getting started, it is wise to explore available possibilities before making a decision.

It is recommended that you hire a professional to provide you with the necessary guidance you need in choosing the right route for convenience and safety reasons.

The Safety of Gas Flex Lines

When it comes to the safety of your manufactured home, flexible gas piping outperforms the usual rigid stainless steel gas pipes.

However, the general safety of the line will still depend on the manner you install your flex gas pipes and this includes grounding, bonding, and checking the whole system for leaking points.

Also, depending on your household gas demand, and the type and number of appliances, you will also have to figure out the right kind of piping to install regarding the and width.

The best and easiest way to ensure utmost safety and reduce or eliminate the danger of gas leaks is to hire a qualified professional installer to work to do the job – whether it is a fresh installation, maintenance work, or repair.

Unlike an ordinary plumber or deciding to go the DIY route, you can be guaranteed quality results.

Even better, a qualified professional will put into consideration such factors as future improvement and modifications and may be readily available in case of problems.

Understanding Supply, Branch, and Risers/Drop Lines

The building line or gas supply line is the piping inside your house.

Branch lines, on another hand, are installed to run to standalone appliances.

The home’s branch line typically terminates in the drop line (a vertical pipe that drops down to the specific appliance from the overhead branch line).

Materials Used in Flexi Gas Lines

Steel, copper, and brass are the most commonly used materials.

Most of the flex gas pipes you will find in the store are made from black steel.

Unlike utility pipes, gas passes are rarely restricted by local codes owing to the zero influence the metals have on gas. Steel piping is black but can be accompanied by malleable steel or iron fittings.

Note: Did you know you can’t use an old Flexi gas line connector to replace a damaged part or reuse it in any way? Most plumbing codes forbid it as it increases the chances of gas-related accidents.

Sizing Your Flexible Gas Connectors


Choosing the right size of Flexi gas connector can be hard for some installers.

Here is how to go about it:

Start by measuring the distance between your appliance and the gas pipe.

Add not more than 3” to the obtained distance to permit for shifting and movement of the appliance: now that’s the connector length you will need to buy. Buying anything too short or long creates the need for kinking and bending

Next thing is to consult the documentation that came with the appliance to know the amount of gas it needs to operate.

Gas appliances, whether natural gas or propane, comes with a maximum BTU input that the connector must meet.

Your range, for example, will demand a connector capable of supplying the total amount of gas required to light all the burners.

The connector’s BTU capacity changes remarkably as the line length and diameter of the line increases.

A large internal diameter means greater gas volumes can flow through.

However, as the length of the connector increases, the maximum volume decreases.

Therefore, a 1/2″ ID connector with a length of 12″ can provide up to 180,000 BTUs of natural gas, whereas a 24″ connector with the same diameter will provide about 150,000 BTUs.

Much of this information can be found in the box that comes with the appliance.

Lastly, you will need to make up your mind about the proper connection size and type before setting out to work on the line.

This includes finding out how the connector ends/tips join the gas supply and appliance.

This too should be written on the appliance or its documentation but you can easily match your old connector if you still have it.

The following issues are typical in flex gas lines:

  • Leaks (yes, leaks do occur at worn-out corrugated parts of connectors, or either of the two sides of the connector if they are not tightened properly)
  • Inappropriate materials – avoid Flexi gas pipes with PVC on them: it doesn’t last like stainless steel and other heavy-duty metals.
  • Inadequate support
  • Rusting – the common 304 stainless steel isn’t the most rust-resistant material out there
  • No drip leg
  • Improper connections
  • Missing shut-off valves
  • Plastic pipes exposed over grade
  • Piping in duct systems or chimneys
  • Incorrectly labeled copper tubing

The consequences of these issues are potential gas leaks and even explosions.

Conclusion

What are manufactured home flex gas lines?

They are pipelines through which your household gas supply flows from your central supply joint into your manufactured home.

Gas flex lines ensures that the homeowner doesn’t have to deal with costly repairs or remodeling once the lines are installed. Also, unlike traditional rigid stainless steel piping,

They involve fewer fittings because they simply bend around most obstacles.

Other than cutting the cost of installation, having to deal with fewer joints also means that the chances of gas leaks are reduced considerably.

Related: What Are the Pros and Cons of Using a Credit Card for Home Improvements?

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