What Are the Pros and Cons of Owning a Home Near a Creek?

What Are the Pros and Cons of Owning a Home Near a Creek?

City life sucks. Noise, lack of space more so parking space, high crime rates, high cost of living, ever-increasing rent, endless traffic jams, et cetera.

You may have thought of relocating upcountry, possibly near a breath-taking and peaceful creek.

So, What Are the Pros and Cons of Owning a Home Near a Creek?

As of pros, expect scenic views of the creek from your patio. Most creeks allow you to descend in them on weekends and splash in the water with your kids as long as you want, even longer. As of cons, prepare yourself for numerous restrictions and responsibilities all intended for the protection of the flora and fauna found in the waterway.

Let’s have a closer look:

The Good Side of Owning a Home Near a Creek

1. Creeks Do Improve Property Value

Creeks, just like most types of waterways, do increase property value.

There are two reasons for that:

Firstly, most creeks are scenic formations. Who wouldn’t want to spend an evening gazing at the narrow sheltered waterway kissing the shoreline in a marsh?

Think of old beautiful trees on the banks with a diverse collection of wildlife.

Secondly, the creeks offer a great buffer zone for those who just want to be left alone.

2. Rich Wildlife at Your Doorstep

Water bodies are magnets for all sorts of animals and plants.

If nature occupies a special place in your heart, you will certainly appreciate the sound of croaking frogs on the banks of the creek; the sight of majestic pelicans and cormorants swooping 30 feet down to catch a meal; and snakes slithering under the bushes.

Of course, you will need to figure out ways of keeping some of these wildlife from crawling into your living space.

3. Bigger Home, More Free Space

Creekside home has a lot in common with an upcountry home with plenty of surrounding space to explore.

Just like most rural homes, a home near a creek is more likely to be bigger than what you’d get in the middle of the city or suburban.

Another thing is privacy – your closest neighbor is likely to be several hundred meters away if not on the other side of the creek.

4. Unrestricted Creeking Whenever You Feel Like

Kids love playing in pools of water, whether that is swimming pool at home, beach, or running under the sprinkler.

Creeks offer endless splashing opportunities and adventure for your family.

Having a home near one means you can play any time you want.

You can’t underestimate the benefits of creeking with your kids.

They get to be exposed to sunshine and fresh outdoor air while enjoying the exciting ambiance.

They also get to explore the cool waters while catching tadpoles and hunting for fossils.

If you are a parent who likes to connect with nature often and take your kids out for fun, finding a home with a creek behind it is like winning at bingo.

5. Healthy, Pest Free Plants

Living close to a riverbank or creek can help minimize chemical inputs and fertilizers on your lawn. You get to benefit from the farm chemicals and fertilizers washing downstream from upland homes and farms.

Plenty of trees and shrubs close to such waterways act to provide a shade and cool water to support certain ornamental plants including whored tickseed, purple coneflowers, Joe Pye weed, fall phlox, butterfly milkweed, and New England Astor.

6. Almost Zero Storms

Creeks play a storm water conveyance role.

They are some of the natural storm drainage features for storm and storm water control.

In fact, creeks are normally integrated with manmade channels and culverts to provide the most reliable storm water drainage systems for regions.

The Bad Side of Owning a Home Near a Creek

1. Lots of Restrictions from Environmentalists and Conservationist Laws

There are animal and plant species that depend entirely on the environment created by the creek.

Depending on your region, certain reptiles and plants may be protected by local conservation laws.

Such laws may end up being a bottleneck on your expansion and landscaping plans and even how you draw water from the creek.

Oftentimes, restrictions involve fence placement such as being barred from placing any sort of fence too close to the creek.

If you are allowed to use landscaping at all, only native landscaping may be permitted.

Besides restrictions, having a home close to a creek may come with plenty of responsibilities as well, including:

  • Harvesting your own water
  • Mulching your garden bed
  • Growing native plants
  • Providing a ready sanctuary for local wildlife
  • Slow down the flow of soil, water, and fertilizer that may pollute the downstream waterway
  • Going slow on chemical use

These and other restrictions and responsibilities sometimes make life unbearable.

2. Having to Deal with Upstream Pollution

It depends on where the creek is located but waterways of this kind rarely stay clear the entire year.

They are prone to pollution depending on the activities taking place upstream and how often it rains in your region.

While the clay and silt at the bottom of the creek may naturally increase the turbidity of the water (when the water becomes brown, murky, or straight ugly to look at), heavy rains will often wash all the debris downstream and turn the once beautiful waterway into something else.

If the people upstream are the reckless type, you will be accustomed to piles of plastic and grass at the edges of the creek.

3. Bothersome Wildlife

Creek wildlife is priceless but can easily make you regret your decision to settle nearby.

For instance, living close to any waterway, to just a creek, requires you to take all measures necessary to keep marauding animals out of your home.

I mean making adjustments to your chimney to keep marine critters at bay, sealing the attic and crawlspace to deny small animals a place to live, and ensuring your doors/windows don’t stay ajar past certain hours.

Bats, birds, and water snakes pose a unique challenge to those with properties close to water bodies of this kind.

Bats, for example, like to establish homes in caves and mangroves along the creek but could end up in darker less-used parts of your home.

Note that having a home away from the waterway doesn’t necessarily mean “no wildlife problems.”

4. Crime

I’d recommend that you check with  CityProtect  first before buying a home near any creek to understand what’s happening around that region.

Crime can happen anywhere for various reasons to different degrees.

However, considering that your closest neighbors are likely going to be several hundred meters away, you need to seriously think about your safety before anything.

Also, most creeks don’t permit easy access to yards or homes.

The road leading to your home is likely to be made of nothing but rough gravel, meaning first respondents may take time to reach you.

Conclusion

So, what are the pros and cons of owning a home near a creek?

They are many.

As of pros, expect scenic views of the creek from your patio.

Most creeks allow you to descend in them on weekends and splash in the water with your kids as long as you want, even longer.

As of cons, prepare yourself for numerous restrictions and responsibilities all intended for the protection of the flora and fauna found in the waterway.

Related

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References

Creek behind the house?

https://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/180808-would-you-buy-a-house-with-a-creek-in-the-backyard/

https://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/2601628

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